The joy (and art) of baking

Talk about all art or ask for advice.

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monkey
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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by monkey » Sun Nov 27, 2011 10:55 pm

Ceta wrote:Just wondering, how many grams/ounces are in a package of vanilla powder? Not sure if I can get that here so, if not, I'll need to find a way to make my own or substitute.

Also, what kind of jam do you recommend for the filling? The cafe only has three kinds -- strawberry, blueberry and orange marmalade -- so I may need to buy some if you think a different flavor would suit the cookies best.
oh yes sry, forgot to write which jam.. usually it is apricot or redcurrant jam but maybe any other jam will also do, think it is a matter of preference.. so actually you could just try all three out and see which is to your taste.
right now i have strawberry jam at home, so when i m going to make the cookies i will use that one. we will see how it will turn out =)

i just noticed something, i think vanilla powder and vanilla sugar is not the same? it should be 1 package vanilla sugar. 1 package contains 8g
i found some info on wikipedia and how you can substitute it
Vanilla sugar is made of sugar, with vanilla beans or mixed with vanilla extract.

It can be costly and difficult to obtain outside Europe but can be simply made at home. Sometimes it can be replaced with vanilla extract, where one teaspoon equals one package. However, when it is needed as a topping, vanilla extract is unsuitable.

Vanilla sugar can be prepared at home by combining approximately 2 cups of white sugar with the scraped seeds of one vanilla bean.

Cheaper vanillin sugar is also available, made only from sugar and vanillin.
the cheesecake, thats a nice idea to put a crust around the cake. i think i need to try that the next time i make one hehe.. haha you reminded me again that i wanted to make donuts. havent looked up the recipe yet, so thx for posting it^^.. now i just wish i had more time so i can actually start making them :/

a random ninja

Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by a random ninja » Sun Nov 27, 2011 11:22 pm

i love cheesecake. probably more than any other food on the planet. when i bake one, i like to cook it at a very high temperature (like 500) for around 10 minutes, depending on the size, and then then turn the temperature down pretty low (like 200-225) for another hour or so. it helps it set without getting too brown.

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Ceta
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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by Ceta » Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:50 am

monkey wrote:oh yes sry, forgot to write which jam.. usually it is apricot or redcurrant jam but maybe any other jam will also do, think it is a matter of preference.. so actually you could just try all three out and see which is to your taste.
I wonder how much that would cost. Strawberry and blueberry jams are pretty cheap (not sure about orange marmalade, but I think it is), but for other jams it's either 1) not available or 2) expensive. The more expensive the supplies, the more the cost will go up, so I need to be careful. Too expensive and I may end up having to eat the expenses.
right now i have strawberry jam at home, so when i m going to make the cookies i will use that one. we will see how it will turn out =)
Since I can't do it outside of the cafe, please let me know how it tastes when you do. ^_^
i just noticed something, i think vanilla powder and vanilla sugar is not the same? it should be 1 package vanilla sugar. 1 package contains 8g
i found some info on wikipedia and how you can substitute it
Vanilla sugar is made of sugar, with vanilla beans or mixed with vanilla extract.

It can be costly and difficult to obtain outside Europe but can be simply made at home. Sometimes it can be replaced with vanilla extract, where one teaspoon equals one package. However, when it is needed as a topping, vanilla extract is unsuitable.

Vanilla sugar can be prepared at home by combining approximately 2 cups of white sugar with the scraped seeds of one vanilla bean.

Cheaper vanillin sugar is also available, made only from sugar and vanillin.
Thanks for letting me know. The vanilla sugar is much more plausible to make (if unable to purchase, that is).
the cheesecake, thats a nice idea to put a crust around the cake. i think i need to try that the next time i make one hehe..
Be sure to use a sharp knife and cut carefully. The crust was pretty delicate and crumbled pretty badly around the areas where cut.
haha you reminded me again that i wanted to make donuts. havent looked up the recipe yet, so thx for posting it^^.. now i just wish i had more time so i can actually start making them :/
If you come across any good doughnut recipes that you think I should try, please post a link/recipe. ^_^

a random ninja wrote:i love cheesecake. probably more than any other food on the planet.
Me, too. Sadly, cream cheese is expensive, so it probably won't be possible to make them often. Thankfully I now know that 400g of cream cheese is more than enough for the size of my springform pan, so it'll save me a little bit of money when I go out shopping.
when i bake one, i like to cook it at a very high temperature (like 500) for around 10 minutes, depending on the size, and then then turn the temperature down pretty low (like 200-225) for another hour or so. it helps it set without getting too brown.
Just to confirm, that's 500 degrees Fahrenheit, right? (Everyone uses Celsius here, so I need to make sure that I'm using the correct temperature scale to avoid making charcoal by accident.)

I do worry a bit about using high temperatures for cooking, though. The oven is strange and cooks things quite fast (and also tends to burn things if you're not watching carefully). The temperature and time for the cheesecake I made was set according to the recipe, but the cheesecake cooked much faster than anticipated. (The recipe stated to cook for 55 minutes, but the cheesecake already finished cooking around 35-40 minutes in.)

Just wondering, though, what flavor do you recommend for cheesecake? Flavors are pretty limited here, so I'd like to try making a flavor that is not very common but something everyone would like. Strawberry, vanilla (including vanilla bean) and matcha are the most popular. I think chocolate is also available, but since I can't make/eat chocolate, I don't really keep up with chocolate goods.

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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by monkey » Mon Nov 28, 2011 8:06 pm

Ceta wrote:
monkey wrote:oh yes sry, forgot to write which jam.. usually it is apricot or redcurrant jam but maybe any other jam will also do, think it is a matter of preference.. so actually you could just try all three out and see which is to your taste.
I wonder how much that would cost. Strawberry and blueberry jams are pretty cheap (not sure about orange marmalade, but I think it is), but for other jams it's either 1) not available or 2) expensive. The more expensive the supplies, the more the cost will go up, so I need to be careful. Too expensive and I may end up having to eat the expenses.
oh i thought you meant you already had these 3 jams available xD then i prolly would take either strawberry or blueberry. for me orange just taste weird with dessert
Me, too. Sadly, cream cheese is expensive, so it probably won't be possible to make them often. Thankfully I now know that 400g of cream cheese is more than enough for the size of my springform pan, so it'll save me a little bit of money when I go out shopping.
do you have quark in the supermarket? because i use quark instead of cream cheese since it is much much cheaper and is delicious too. but i dont know how the price is in other countries because in my country quark was very cheap but i moved to another country where it is twice or triple the price.. but there seems to be a way to make your own quark which i also need to try out..

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BourbonBlues
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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by BourbonBlues » Mon Nov 28, 2011 8:52 pm

I am new here, but I would like to say I think that the cheesecake donuts posted on page one may be the greatest invention in all of human history. :D

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Ceta
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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by Ceta » Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:13 pm

haha...I wish I could call those cheesecake doughnuts, but they're just plain cheesecake batter baked in a doughnut mold. The next chance I get, I should add in an egg and flour to see if I can get them to take on more of a true doughnut shape.

a random ninja

Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by a random ninja » Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:36 am

oh, right, fahrenheit. i forgot you're in japan lol.

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Ceta
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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by Ceta » Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:28 pm

monkey wrote:oh i thought you meant you already had these 3 jams available xD then i prolly would take either strawberry or blueberry. for me orange just taste weird with dessert
Yeah, those three are already available in the cafe. They're always in stock because they're the easiest (and cheapest) to obtain. While it is possible to get other flavors, the amount of stores carrying them are not very abundant, not to mention the quantity is less despite the higher cost.
do you have quark in the supermarket? because i use quark instead of cream cheese since it is much much cheaper and is delicious too. but i dont know how the price is in other countries because in my country quark was very cheap but i moved to another country where it is twice or triple the price.. but there seems to be a way to make your own quark which i also need to try out..
Sadly, I doubt the supermarkets carry that. (Never heard of it.) The most that is available in terms of foreign brands is Philadelphia Cream Cheese. While there are other brands as well, this is the one I prefer. Unfortunately, it costs more than the others, so I can't buy it often.
a random ninja wrote:oh, right, fahrenheit. i forgot you're in japan lol.
haha...Yeah, since I don't really say it often, it's easy to forget. Anyway, thanks for the clarification. ^_^

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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by monkey » Sat Dec 03, 2011 8:37 pm

Ceta wrote:
right now i have strawberry jam at home, so when i m going to make the cookies i will use that one. we will see how it will turn out =)
Since I can't do it outside of the cafe, please let me know how it tastes when you do. ^_^
so today i made the cookies and it tastes fine with the strawberry jam =D but i had a bit of a struggle with the dough as it had a sticky consistency and it was not possible to roll it out.. after doing some research it was because of the butter, it got too soft.. so when doing the dough it is better to mix all the ingredients except the butter first (but put some flours aside). then put the small pieces of butter on the dough, cover it with the rest of the flour and knead it. this way the butter is protected from the heat of your hand. also, the dough should not be kneaded too long.

man, that was kind of really frustrating not knowing what was wrong with the dough lol.. next time it will hopefully go better..

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Ceta
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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by Ceta » Sun Dec 04, 2011 2:11 pm

monkey wrote:so today i made the cookies and it tastes fine with the strawberry jam =D
That's good to hear. I'll be sure to recommend that to the customers when I give the cookies a try.
but i had a bit of a struggle with the dough as it had a sticky consistency and it was not possible to roll it out.. after doing some research it was because of the butter, it got too soft.. so when doing the dough it is better to mix all the ingredients except the butter first (but put some flours aside). then put the small pieces of butter on the dough, cover it with the rest of the flour and knead it. this way the butter is protected from the heat of your hand. also, the dough should not be kneaded too long.

man, that was kind of really frustrating not knowing what was wrong with the dough lol.. next time it will hopefully go better..
In a way, it sounds a little similar to the method for making pie crust in the video tutorial I was watching. Well, for the butter, anyway. (Click here to watch.)



=====================

Update notice: Because of all that went on today and all that I need to prepare tomorrow, I will be updating on Tuesday (my time). Next updates will be on December 11th and 18th, per normal schedule. The cafe will be closed during the winter holiday after the 18th since most of the staff will be returning home for Christmas and New Year's, so sweets-making will be on hiatus until the cafe reopens in January. In order to keep this thread active, however, I plan to post recipes of normal foods that I make in my apartment's [shoebox] kitchen.

monkey
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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by monkey » Sat Dec 10, 2011 3:49 pm

In a way, it sounds a little similar to the method for making pie crust in the video tutorial I was watching. Well, for the butter, anyway. (Click here to watch.)
nice link, watched some of the other videos too.. very interesting =)

here is a photo of the second attempt cookies i made, i used a straw to cut the holes haha

Image

next i want to try the chestnut and black sesame scones, i hope they have black sesame in the supermarket cause they really didnt have grounded almonds =o

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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by Ceta » Sun Dec 11, 2011 4:17 am

monkey wrote:nice link, watched some of the other videos too.. very interesting =)
haha...Yeah, that's pretty much how I end up spending so much time during the week researching recipes. (It's also why I find it hard to choose a recipe I want to do. I want to try them all.)
here is a photo of the second attempt cookies i made, i used a straw to cut the holes haha

[Image]
Thanks for posting the pic. I was wondering what they looked like when finished. ^_^
next i want to try the chestnut and black sesame scones, i hope they have black sesame in the supermarket cause they really didnt have grounded almonds =o
For grounded nuts, what I usually do is just buy whole nuts and then dice them up with a knife until they are close enough to the texture I need. They don't sell ground nuts here either, plus I don't have a mortar and pestle, so that's about the most that I can do. As for the black sesame, I'm sure they would have it. If it's not in the section for seasonings, you can always try looking in the section where they carry Asian foods (if your supermarket has one, that is). If they don't carry it at all, according to some substitution websites I was looking at, you can always substitute with normal sesame or poppy seeds.

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major banana
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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by major banana » Thu Dec 22, 2011 1:48 pm

This stuff looks really good.

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Re: The joy (and art) of baking

Post by deragoku » Tue Apr 17, 2012 2:25 am

It is an illustration and jam the cookie. Cookies can be kept for a long time, they actually taste better the longer you wait.

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