Creating Line Art

Talk about all art or ask for advice.

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Ceta
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Post by Ceta » Fri Sep 07, 2007 12:17 pm

hmmm...Well, then let's see.

For pens, I recommend using either Sakura Micron or Staedtler Drafting pens. They're felt tip pens so they're easy to start out with and come in various sizes for whatever your needs are. You can get them from just about any art supply store, but just to be sure you should call ahead and find out which stores carry them. There's also the online option, but it's easier (and quicker) just to buy them from your local store.

I don't really suggest using the more advanced pens if you're just starting out. There's a particular method that you'll need to learn in order to use the calligraphy style pens that many pros use, but that's a lot more hassle than it's worth if you don't know the basics. Once you've become skilled at inking with felt tip pens, then you can decide whether you wish to move on to the calligraphy style pens.

As for tracing paper, basically the smoother the paper the better. If the paper is slightly wrinkly, then your picture may end up looking distorted in various areas when you scan it in. There's a particular type of marker paper that I've found in some art stores that is actually much better than tracing paper -- it's transparent enough you can trace your pencil drawings and designed for marker/pen work -- but it's been so long since I've used it that I don't remember exactly what it's called or what the brand is. Best thing I can suggest is that, when you go to your local art store, bring one of your drawings with you to test the transparency of the marker-oriented sketchbooks. To do this, all you have to do is place your drawing behind one of the sheets in the sketchbook. If the picture shows up clear through the paper, you've found the right one. If not, keep trying until you do.

If you can't seem to find the right paper, then talk to a clerk and see if they can't help you find it. Chances are, if they can't find it then they can order it for you.

After you have your supplies, it's time to go to either your local library or bookstore. In the art section, you should be able to find plenty of books that give detailed tutorials on how to ink drawings. There was one that I found to be really helpful which was published by DC Comics that was all about inking, but it's not something you're likely to find at your local library -- unless your library is really awesome -- and it's hard to say if regular bookstores carry it (I bought it at a comic book shop). Best thing you can do is just take a couple hours or so and skim through the books until you come across one that you think will help you the most. Since every book has a slightly different approach to teaching certain methods/techniques, you should choose the one that's right for you rather than rely on other's recommendations since everyone has their own method to learning.

One point I almost forgot to mention is the type of book. While it's generally a good idea to get a book on inking for comics since the tutorials are geared toward those who wish to learn more about inking specifically for comics, really just about any type of book on inking will do as long as it teaches you the things you need to learn. If you master inking realism, however, the amount of things you can do from there are practically limitless. The reason for this is that, like penciling, the better you understand how to render things in the real world, the easier you can adjust to the various situations that you come across since just about everything in the illustration world is based off something in real life (for everything else, it's just a matter of choosing the style of inking that would best work for that particular drawing style).

Once you've got your book, it's time to get started on studying the basics. This is probably about the most boring part (unless you really love reading tutorial books), but the harder you study and put into practice the techniques you read about, the more you'll really benefit because after you've learned the basics it's all fun stuff from there.

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Caffeine
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Post by Caffeine » Sat Sep 08, 2007 12:04 am

thank you!
You can't get rid of me.
Deviantart: here

rin_rin_89

Post by rin_rin_89 » Sat Sep 08, 2007 4:22 pm

A wise, old owl once told me...

"If you're an amateur artist asking for supply suggestions, try my approach: a Sharpie marker and a napkin. I say this to stress that it's not WHAT you use to draw, but that you're actually drawing.

Now, next time you're in Asel Art supplies ask yourself...couldn't I just do this with a Sharpie?"

But, hey...if you have the time and the money, use what you want. Just keep in mind that if you buy something expensive, you're using it up on learning how to use it. That's why Ceta suggested not to use more advanced pens yet. Practice makes perfect, so get on it and show us some results!~

cericcalas
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Post by cericcalas » Fri Sep 14, 2007 8:45 am

rin_rin_89 wrote:A wise, old owl once told me...

"If you're an amateur artist asking for supply suggestions, try my approach: a Sharpie marker and a napkin. I say this to stress that it's not WHAT you use to draw, but that you're actually drawing.

Now, next time you're in Asel Art supplies ask yourself...couldn't I just do this with a Sharpie?"

But, hey...if you have the time and the money, use what you want. Just keep in mind that if you buy something expensive, you're using it up on learning how to use it. That's why Ceta suggested not to use more advanced pens yet. Practice makes perfect, so get on it and show us some results!~
You may call that wisdom but it's not really wise to answer someone's question if the answer is has nothing to do with the question. This is a suggestion of personal preference I'm asking for. If I wanted a useless reply I'd ask my non-artisan friends. I've used sharpie on napkin btw, bleeds too much for decent line-art. Maybe I should just use a knife on my wrist? Think that'd turn out good? Wouldn't cost me a dime.

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major banana
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Post by major banana » Fri Sep 14, 2007 11:44 am

Hey poopy-head, you got 2 pages of good reply, and you still nag about 1 reply that's not the PERFECT answer to your question.

The most efficient, easy, fast way of inking is to draw in photoshop (or better, manga studio) with a tablet. No mess, no erasing, undo option. You'll have a standard, clean drawing. Depending on your skills, it's better or worse than the majority of crap that's out there on deviantart and such. Your non-artisan friends will adore you for it.

Next to what i already posted, my suggestion of personal preference is to draw a sketch on ANY piece of paper and turn sketch into a so-so clean pencil drawing. Then ink it yourself, with anything that has black ink in it. You can mimic those 'dynamic' pen lines easily if you like. If you make a mistake, try to cover it. You shouldn't be making mistakes when you're inking anyhow, there's a clear drawing under it that shows you where to ink.

Nobody will tell me that i didn't use a collection of fancy sakura school-g akadot nib pens. No, i used 1 staedler pigmentliner that someone borrowed me for eternity, and i inked on the back of my art theory book.

It's not about what you use, it's about how you use it. If you can't draw, it'll suck no matter what fancy material you have. I don't believe in learn to draw, only in learn to draw better or faster when you already got some talent. Oh wait you didn't ask that. Scrap last paragrahps

edited by Dustin C.

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Ceta
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Post by Ceta » Fri Sep 14, 2007 12:17 pm

cericcalas wrote:You may call that wisdom but it's not really wise to answer someone's question if the answer is has nothing to do with the question. This is a suggestion of personal preference I'm asking for. If I wanted a useless reply I'd ask my non-artisan friends. I've used sharpie on napkin btw, bleeds too much for decent line-art. Maybe I should just use a knife on my wrist? Think that'd turn out good? Wouldn't cost me a dime.
While you may not have realized it, rin_rin_89's post has some good information. However, as you're still a beginner, I guess it'll take some time for you to really see it. Also, I think that her comment was geared more toward Caffeine, not you, since Caffeine is the one who was asking about the kinds of art supplies that would be best to work with.

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Dustin C.
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Post by Dustin C. » Fri Sep 14, 2007 3:42 pm

ceric, i wouldnt call that useless, i'd call it helpful.
sure it may be something you already know, but come one, a person is trying to be nice to someone else. no need to bite their head off. :?

MajorB, i like that wise old owl. ^^
btw, how the crap do you use MangaStudio? 6=_= ;;

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VIIStar
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Post by VIIStar » Fri Sep 14, 2007 10:28 pm

*crawls out from under rock*
whoa.

i don't know if i'd agree with the sharpie comment, the last thing i'd recommend is to use restrictive media when you're starting out. i got my tech pens when i was... in HS? forever ago. loved them. hate fibre tips. microns and such.

we can sit here and say what we use till the cows come home and it won't really help. it's all trying things out and finding what works for YOU.

all i'd say is if your nervous don't touch ink until you can make solid pencils (if you want dark lines, try an ebony pencil super sharp) and then transfer to another sheet of paper.

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major banana
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Post by major banana » Sat Sep 15, 2007 1:08 am

sorry for bad word use there.

I don't know, manga studio is pretty straight-forward, you import a sketch on a raster layer and ink over your scanned sketch. Or you sketch on a sketch layer and ink later. I prefer the manual sketch, the digital sketch is weird and nothing but pixel dots. Their main site has some basic tutorials which were very helpful (i think). Manga studio will give you the fastest inked drawing, with dynamic lines and everything.

rabid panda

Post by rabid panda » Fri Sep 21, 2007 8:11 pm

cericcalas wrote:Maybe I should just use a knife on my wrist? Think that'd turn out good?

dear god we have a winner. finally someone asks the really important questions

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Aether
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PENS! or PEZ?!

Post by Aether » Sat Sep 22, 2007 2:51 pm

(Falls from tree eating a muffin with pet rock[sorry VII but I had to do something funny too and your thing was too perfect])
I use a pen. A run of the mill plain old biro. It's sooooo easy to use, and yeah cericcalas no need to get all bitchy! Someone just wants to be funny and informative, let them be funny and informative. Don't be like our nightmarish corporate society and crush all forms of creativity, seriously not cool dude. GO RIN_RIN_89! ^_^

CERRICCALAS IS PART OF THE SPANISH INQUISITION! (just kidding... or am I?)

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Caffeine
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Post by Caffeine » Sat Sep 22, 2007 5:22 pm

I hope not, they grilled people you know.

rabid panda

Post by rabid panda » Mon Sep 24, 2007 5:51 pm

with the overpopulation we have going on is that a bad idea really? something like three billion people gotta go somewhere otherwise the planets pretty much doomed

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Dustin C.
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Post by Dustin C. » Tue Sep 25, 2007 2:56 am

then help us out rabid, jump! ^_^

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VIIStar
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Post by VIIStar » Tue Sep 25, 2007 4:21 pm

I want to go to mars!!

8)

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